Tag Archives: Vitamin

More Antioxidants In Your Diet May Not Mean Better Health (NPR)

7 Apr
Blackberries are a source of polyphenol antiox...

Blackberries are a source of polyphenol antioxidants (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

In a new study, people who ate more antioxidants overall didn’t lower their risk of stroke and dementia in old age. That flies in the face of earlier research that found that the antioxidants in fruits and vegetables reduce stroke and dementia risk.

“We’re seeing strong and clear benefits with specific antioxidants but not overall,” says , an epidemiologist at Brigham and Women’s Hospital who led the new study, which was online in the journal Neurology.

Read more:

http://www.npr.org/blogs/thesalt/2013/02/20/172511813/more-antioxidants-in-your-diet-may-not-mean-better-health

Crazy About Kale

26 Nov

Back to the NBC Today article that I mentioned in my last post

Source: organicauthority.com via Tsahia on Pinterest

I noticed kale popped up in three categories so I figured it had to be a super inflammation fighter.

Here are some of the benefits of kale relating to arthritis excerpted from Fight Arthritis with these foods:

Vitamin C:  Vitamin C is one of the nutrients most responsible for the health of collagen, a major component of cartilage. If you have osteoarthritis, I wouldn’t want you to risk your health with supplements, so you should only get vitamin C from food sources — not from an individual supplement (100% of the Daily Value found in a standard multivitamin is fine, but avoid brands with larger amounts).

Some of the best foods for vitamin C: guava, sweet peppers (yellow/red/green), oranges, grapefruit, strawberries, pineapple, kohlrabi, papayas, lemons, broccoli, kale, brussels sprouts, kidney beans, kiwi, cantaloupe, cauliflower, red cabbage, mangos, white potato (with skin) and mustard greens.

Carotenes: The carotenoids are a group of powerful antioxidant nutrients found in many fruits and vegetables. When it comes to arthritis, the carotenoid called beta-cryptoxanthin may reduce the risk of developing inflammation-related disorders, including rheumatoid arthritis. Researchers from the United Kingdom found that adding just one additional serving each day of a food high in beta-cryptoxanthin helped reduce arthritis risk.

Some of the best foods for beta carotene include: sweet potato, carrots, kale, butternut squash, turnip greens, pumpkin, mustard greens, cantaloupe, sweet red pepper, apricots and spinach.

Some of the best foods for beta cryptoxanthin include: winter squash, pumpkin, persimmons, papaya, tangerines, red peppers, corn, oranges and apricots.

Bioflavonoids — quercetin and anthocyanidins:  The bioflavonoids quercetin and anthocyanidins are both forms of antioxidants. The anti-inflammatory effects of quercetin may seem to be similar to those of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory medications (such as aspirin and ibuprofen).

Some of the best foods for quercetin: onions (red, yellow, white), kale, leeks, cherry tomatoes, broccoli, blueberries, black currants, elderberries, lingonberries, cocoa powder, apricots and apples with skin (*Red Delicious).

I recently found kale salad in a box at the grocery store. It comes with shredded carrots and is perfect for lunch. I add some pears and goat cheese or strawberries and blue cheese with balsamic vinaigrette. The great thing about kale is you can dress it ahead of time with out it going soggy. So no need to bring a separate container of dressing to work for lunch.

Do you like kale? What’s your favorite way to eat it?